Disclaimer  The views and opinions on this website are my own and do not represent the Seattle Seahawks organization. All photos belong to their respective owners.

Rookie Roll Call: Offense

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Rashaad Penny

 

Draft Pick: Round 1, 27th Overall

Position: Running Back

College: San Diego State (Senior)

Height: 5’11”

Weight: 220lbs

 

College Career in Numbers

The Hawk Talk Verdict:

 

I’ll start by saying I like this kid. His 2017 tape is excellent (the game against Arizona State stands out) and he led all FBS running backs in rushing yards. He runs hard, breaks tackles and should be a safety blanket for Russell Wilson, showing his worth taking dump-offs and hot routes for positive yardage. Penny also returned kickoffs and punts at SD State, but whether he’ll see much work in this area remains to be seen, with Tyler Lockett currently entrenched in that role. 

 

Analysing some of his highlights he appears to have the ability to run hard through the tackles whilst also having the speed to make chunk yardage on stretch plays. If the O line play improves this year, teams will have to respect his presence as he’s certainly capable of running in touchdowns from all over the field, on all four downs. Penny fumbled the ball 3 times in 2017 on over 300 touches, which, for me, is an acceptable rate, given his 2383 scrimmage yards and 25 total TDs.

 

Penny had an impressive showing in the 40 yard dash at the combine, clocking 4.46 seconds at 220lbs. A seriously impressive time for a big back. After pinning some of our hopes on Eddie “Feast Mode” Lacy last year, I feel more confident we’ll have a more consistent, faster, fitter big back to potentially become a bell cow for the team. 

 

I do think the pick was a little bit of a reach, but without a 2ndround pick there may not have been much option if Carroll and Schneider were sold on Penny, as they’ve stated since the draft, claiming they would have taken him at 18 had they not been given the option to trade back. 

 

Best Case Scenario:

 

Penny comes in to the starting line up, behind a much improved offensive line, and a nice addition in blocking tight end Ed Dickson. He immediately makes an impact, becoming a bell cow for the team by week 4 and opening up big play opportunities in the passing game off of play action. 

Stats: 1150 rushing yards, 10 TDs

 

Worst Case Scenario:

 

The offensive line crumbles, the running game is non-existent and Penny is left on the bench in favour of passing down backs like J.D. McKissic. His confidence is hit and he looks a shadow of the player he was in college. 

Stats: 320 rushing yards 0 TDs

 

 

Will Dissly

 

Draft Pick: Round 4, 120thOverall

Position: Tight End

College: Washington (Senior)

Height: 6’4”

Weight: 267lbs

 

College Career in Numbers

 

 

The Hawk Talk Verdict:

 

Dissly is a big, strong man. A former defensive lineman at Washington, he’s got limited experience at tight end but that hasn’t stopped him making some eye catching plays. What jumps out from his tape is the strength he shows after contact, consistently carrying would-be tacklers with him for extra yardage. 

As a blocker, he has acclimated quickly to his duties, and while his technique may need some work, he has the potential to be what the Seahawks have needed at the position since Zach Miller departed for Chicago. With the addition of run-favouring coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and first round running back Rashaad Penny, Seattle should be on their way to recreating the run heavy, in-your-face offense that spearheaded back to back Superbowl trips in 2013/14. 

John Schneider has already commented that he and coach Carroll were blown away by the softness of Dissly’s hands when catching, despite his limited experience as a pass catcher. This, coupled with his ample athleticism, should make him another weapon for Russell Wilson to utilise in the pass game. 

What a lot of scouts have said about Dissly is that he’s a real team player. He will do whatever is asked of him, and do it to the best of his ability. He is exactly the sort of guy Seattle want in the locker room. Our team is a family and Will should fit in nicely. All in all, this was a nice pick, not flashy, but exactly what the Seahawks need as they try to rediscover their identity. 

 

Best Case Scenario:

 

Dissly contributes on special teams, and sporadically on offense. He learns the position and continues to improve and work towards reaching his full potential. He becomes a key blocker in power run sets by the end of the year. Makes a few catches when asked. 

 

Worst Case Scenario:

 

Seattle relies heavily on the passing game as the run game splutters. Dissly’s lack of experience is exposed at the NFL level. His lack of top-level athleticism limits his activity on special teams. 

 

 

Jamarco Jones

 

Draft Pick: Round 5, 168thOverall

Position: Offensive Lineman

College: Ohio State (Senior)

Height: 6’4”

Weight: 294lbs

 

The Hawk Talk Verdict:

 

Seattle’s offensive line woes are well documented. There have been many steps taken (and draft picks spent) to try and improve this position group, and Jones is the latest. On paper, the top line stats look promising. Jones started his final 27 games at left tackle at one of the very top programs in college football. But look further and you will see that Jones is a developmental pick who is unlikely to contribute straight away. 

 

Jones displayed many positive traits during his four year stint at Ohio State. His first two seasons were spent backing up Taylor Decker, who is currently patrolling Matthew Stafford’s blindside in Detroit. Following Decker’s drafting, Jones stepped into the starting lineup, and performed admirably, utilising his long limbs and lateral agility to overcome his lack of ideal height. 

 

At the combine, Jones had what some analysts have described as an “atrocious” workout. This is likely the main reason he slipped to the fifth round, having been projected as high as the 2nd round on some boards. Questions linger over his athleticism and/or work ethic. Jones will likely need to prove himself in camp or risk not being on the active roster when the season starts. 

 

Best Case Scenario:

 

Jones performs well in the preseason, he slots into a backup role learning from veterans like Duane Brown. Jones plays as a situational blocker in special packages and has a chance to start in future seasons. 

 

Worst Case Scenario:

 

Jones’ lack of athleticism is exposed at the NFL level, a poor work ethic leads him to fall out with fellow players and coaches. Jones is not on the active roster come September. 

 

You can now support Hawk Talk via Patreon, thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Sunday, September 9, 2018

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Please reload